ID 0066

State Government of New South Wales beginning 25 March 1988 - period in office of Premier Greiner, Nicholas Frank Hugo ending on 24 June 1992



Period in office of premier (see Glossary entry for 'period in office' and related terms)

Premier
Greiner, Nicholas Frank Hugo
Date of beginning of period in office
25 March 1988
Date of end of period in office
24 June 1992 
Reason for end of preceding period in office
Loss of general election 
Reason for end of this government
Change of party leader
Number of days in office
1,552 

Parliamentary support during period

Party affiliation of premier at start of period
Liberal Party
If coalition government
Coalition partner 1
National Party
Coalition partner 2
--none--
Coalition partner 3
--none--
Coalition partner 4
--none--
Party support in parliament at beginning of period
Coalition
If change in parliamentary support during period
25 May 1991
Coalition Minority
Result of general election
If further change during period
--none--  

Number of ministers at beginning of period (this may vary during the period)

Total number of ministers
21
Number from party of premier
14
Number from coalition party 1
7
Number from coalition party 2
Number from upper house
3
Number who are women
1

Assembly elections contested as premier or after which became premier (see Glossary entry for 'after election')

* to view table drag left or right.
Election Premier at election Premier's party Premier after election Premier's party
NSW 25 May 1991Nicholas Frank Hugo GreinerLiberal PartyNicholas Frank Hugo GreinerLiberal Party
NSW 19 March 1988Barrie John UnsworthAustralian Labor PartyNicholas Frank Hugo GreinerLiberal Party

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Notes

Loss of election (Unsworth): Beginning of Greiner's period in office; see Jim Hagan and Craig Clothier, '1988' in Michael Hogan and David Clune (editors), The People's Choice: Electoral Politics in 20th Century New South Wales, vol. 3 (1968-1999), pp. 251-281 at p. 254, (Sydney: Parliament of New South Wales and University of Sydney, 2001, ISBN 0909907412).

Change in parliamentary support: 'Following the [May] 1991 election, the government held 49 of the 99 seats against the opposition's 46 and there were four independents. Greiner unsuccessfully approached long-serving Independent John Hatton (South Coast) about the possibility of his becoming Speaker to break the deadlock. However, the coalition government secured the support of "conservative Independent" Tony Windsor and made commitments to provide significant benefits to his Tamworth electorate'; further negotiations with other independents led to the government's adoption of a 'Charter of Reform' to secure support for the Greiner coalition minority government; see Tony Smith, '1995', in Michael Hogan and David Clune (editors), The People's Choice: Electoral Politics in 20th Century New South Wales, vol. 3 (1968-1999), pp. 323-368 at pp. 323-324, (Sydney: Parliament of New South Wales and University of Sydney, 2001, ISBN 0909907412).

Change of party leader (Greiner): When Terry Metherell failed to be reappointed to the ministry after the 1991 election, he resigned from the Liberal Party and sat in the Assembly as an Independent, further weakening the position of the Greiner Liberal Party and National Party coalition minority government. In April 1992, Metherell resigned his seat in the Legislative Assembly providing the Liberal Party with the opportunity to regain control of the seat at a by-election. '[Metherell's] appointment to a senior public service role led to an inquiry by the Independent Commission Against Corruption; its report released on 19 June 1992 was critical of [Premier] Greiner's and [Environment minister Tim] Moore's parts in the affair. Proposals for a motion of confidence led to their resignations on 24 June; [Michael] Yabsley, who supported them, also resigned. Fahey was elected leader and [Bruce] Baird deputy leader. The ICAC findings against Greiner and Moore were subsequently overturned in the NSW Court of Appeal', Hughes, p. 54, (see 'Sources', below); for more details of these events, see Melleuish, pp. 457-460 (see 'References', below), and Tony Smith, '1995', in Michael Hogan and David Clune (editors), The People's Choice: Electoral Politics in 20th Century New South Wales, vol. 3 (1968-1999), pp. 323-368 at pp. 323-328, (Sydney: Parliament of New South Wales and University of Sydney, 2001, ISBN 0909907412).

References: For an analysis of the role of Premier in New South Wales, see David Clune and Ken Turner, 'Introduction: The Changing Role of the Premier in the 20th Century', pp. 1-14, in Clune and Turner vol. 2 (see, 'Sources', below), and for a review of government policies under Premier Greiner, see Martin Laffin and Martin Painter, Reform and Reversal: Lessons from the Coalition Government in New South Wales 1988-1995, (South Melbourne, Vic.: Macmillan, 1995, ISBN 0732931673).

For a survey of Greiner's political career, see Greg Melleuish, 'Nicholas Frank Greiner', in Clune and Turner, vol. 2, pp. 443-462, (see 'Sources', below).

Sources

David Clune and Ken Turner (editors), The Premiers of New South Wales, vol. 2, (1901-2005), (Sydney: Federation Press, 2006, ISBN 186287551); Colin A Hughes, A Handbook of Australian Government and Politics 1985-1999, pp. 298-311, (Sydney: Federation Press, 2002, ISBN 1862874344); New South Wales, Parliament, The New South Wales Parliamentary Record: Legislative Council and Legislative Assembly, 1824-1999, vol. VI, pp. 246-308, (Sydney: Parliament of New South Wales, 1999). In consulting these sources, note the difference between ministries and periods in office.

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